Wizard Repair Shop for Frostgrave – with paint

So I took this dodgy bunch of broken and battered 1980s lead wizards –

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Did a little repairing, sprucing up and put them on modern bases –

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Applied a quick paint job and gave the bases a stone and snow effect –

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Now four wizards that had seen better days and weren’t really fit for anything except an eternity at the bottom of my lead lump are back in business ready for Frostgrave.

Next up will be some of the Soldier elements used in the game. For this I’ve gone modern with a box of GW Bretonnian Archers (already in my possession) and a sprue of 8 Fireforge Foot Sergeants bought off eBay.

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I personally think the Fireforge Foot Sergeant miniatures look very similar to the official Frostgrave soldiers made by North Star.

Barbarians, Thieves, Thugs and Apothecaries will follow later. It appears Midlam Miniatures have a decent range that will suit most of these so we’ll see what happens.

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12 thoughts on “Wizard Repair Shop for Frostgrave – with paint

  1. Tarmor

    They all look so much better even just re-based and with undercoat. Final result is great! The face on the female is a bit of a disappointment, but apart from that I really like the way they came out.

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    1. Somet Post author

      Thanks, I’ve found undercoating old lead figures not only primes but also really helps with actually seeing the figure for what it is. I assume all the different patinas and wear and tear on old metal distracts the eye from the detail, this often gives the effect of a sculpt that probably isn’t worth painting – applying undercoat flattens all these out leaving a better idea of how the actual original sculpt should look painted up. It certainly shows that here in the first 2 photos.

      If I can offer some defence for the female face, my hamfisted painting skills can’t take full credit/blame for how she turned out. If you Google image her (Citadel FA16 Female Wizard with Staff should get you a few) you’ll notice all the images are taken side on, similar to my first pic of her. There’s a reason for that that you’ve noticed.
      She’s best described as ‘aesthetically challenged’. She’s got a crooked mouth and slanted right eye that reminds me of the Halflings that the Perry Twins were sculpting around this time.
      This is actually the third one of this model I’ve painted so I know it’s not a casting fault, that’s how she was sculpted.
      I went along with the ‘Halfling slack jawed yokel’ vibe and gave her the gappy teeth and slightly odd eyes. Sadly I couldn’t bring myself to give her lamb chop sideburns…

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    1. Somet Post author

      Thanks!

      The snow recipe was a simple mix taken off the net, a lot of people seem to use it.

      It’s roughly 50:50 bicarbonate of soda to PVA glue with a few drops of white paint – the paint is in there to prevent yellowing as it dries. You’re looking to make a thick consistency that you can blob on.

      I didn’t try it this time but apparently if you alter the mix (for example increase the PVA and decrease the amount of paint) you can create slush/ice effects – something worth experimenting with.

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      1. Somet Post author

        We all know it’s best to avoid the yellow snow…
        From what I’ve read it’s Baking Powder that turns yellow whereas Bicarbonate of Soda (apparently) stays white. After a quick glance at the ingredients Bicarbonate of Soda just contains Sodium Carbonate whereas baking powder also contains Diphosphates and Maize Starch.
        Does the starch make it turn yellow? That would be my (uneducated) guess but I’ve never used it before so I’ll just have to wait and see if it happens with Bicarbonate of Soda.
        If you’re unwilling to take a chance you might want to use something like Gale Force 9 snow effect instead.

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  2. Azazel

    Nice work resurrecting these guys. You’re dead right that the broken, stained and scarred figures look about right for the rubbish heap sometimes, and you’ve certainly recovered these four.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Somet Post author

      Thanks, like a lot of painters I’ve got plenty (but luckily not too many) old preslotta models that could be perfectly serviceable if I put my mind to it. I think it’s all about finding the right use for them to spur some action into getting them table ready.

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