Frostgrave Combatants Pt5 – More Soldiers

I managed to pick up the following four figures off eBay at a reasonable price a few weeks back, obviously with my ongoing Frostgrave project in mind.

They’re all Citadel metal slotta based miniatures mostly meant for Warhammer. They span an interesting few of years of production. We start at 1985 and the 2nd Ed of WFB, through 1986 and the 1st Ed of WFRP and then beyond that into 1987 and the 3th Ed of WFB – aka ‘Oldhammer’.

First up is one of the ADD 6 Paladins from the TSR licenced AD&D miniatures range from 1985. These Player Character packs were obviously meant for AD&D rather than Warhammer and sold in blisters of 3, representing the same character from low to high level as they developed in the game.
I say that like it was actually a possibility. Most people played RPGs in the 80s with a GM who was a total dick and TPK after every session was the norm. That meant the other 2 better equipped miniatures were never needed…

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I’m quite nostalgic (unusual for me) about this whole Citadel AD&D range however I disliked these Paladin figures at the time and I have to admit I wasn’t looking forward to painting one now. I’m not totally happy with the finished paint job but it’s useable so I’m glad I completed it.

Next up is this C01 Fighter – ‘Aldred Fellblade’ from early 1986. This figure is probably best known from his depiction by John Sibbick on the cover of WFRP 1st Edition – presumably using all his fate points just to survive up to that point and run through the Ogre. He probably got finished off by a goblin in the next round…

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I’d never really paid much attention to the miniature when it came out and remember the Sibbick illustration more. After looking properly at it now it had escaped me just how ‘Jes Goodwin’ the sculpt actually is.

The final couple are F2 Fighters from 1987 – ‘Ernst Stoutheart’ and  ‘Altdorf Sergeant’.

Both these miniatures are from a time when the WFRP and WFB backgrounds were finally starting to mesh together in an uneasy union. Although the RPG game was a fully fleshed out ‘realistic’ world of socio-economic political intrigue, the wargame of fantasy battles struggled to find mechanisms to cope with the vast injection of fluff from the roleplay game.
So 3rd Ed WFB always felt stuck in the vein of classic fantasy, heavy with the presence of Orcs, Elves and Dwarfs rather than the grim dark Human centric Renaissance Period feel of WFRP. For this reason the two games sat uneasily side by side in my view despite their supposedly shared background.
Even the later Realms of Chaos books put the WFB action at the furthest points of Human influence – the chaos wastes or in the deepest of Empirical forest rather than the backstreets of Altdorf like WFRP had.
By the time WFRP was finally sidelined in 1992 GW had already taken the opportunity to pluck the easily workable bits from it to use with the forthcoming 4th Ed WFB (Bretonnian Knights for instance) whilst other concepts were slowly spoon fed back into the game as new additions (such as Tilean Mercenary units).

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Anyway, both of these miniatures painted up okay and will work quite well as murder hobos in Frostgrave.

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8 thoughts on “Frostgrave Combatants Pt5 – More Soldiers

  1. Azazel

    Great post to go with the usual lovely models. I always enjoy reading different perspectives on the old days, especially when they’re balanced and willing to be critical. (Those rose-coloured specs seem to make a lot of people very shortsighted!) I love the Goodwin model, though I never owned it and my memories of it are from a WD around either the 80’s or 100’s. You’ve also (sadly) reminded me of a commission I painted a ton of – a variation on the second Murder Hobo with the floppy hat. What a horrible figure it was, especially to paint 20 of, and with such a garish scheme that they wanted…

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    1. Somet Post author

      Thanks, when I bought these I really did have any expectations for the Paladin or Mr Floppy Hat – neither are great sculpts. The Paladin was as expected but surprisingly I quite like how Mr Floppy Hat turned out. I certainly wouldn’t want to paint an entire regiment of him though – not sure what was going through your commissioner’s head to choose him for that!

      The Goodwin sculpt was from the same group of fighters that some people refer to the most popular one as ‘The Prototype Elric’ – they were all quite slight and Dark Elf like, almost effeminate in the facial features – very Melnibonéan.

      Btw the magenta used on some of these figures came from our conversation about your use of the old GW ‘Dragon Fire Crimson’ – from memory I felt modern GW ‘Screamer Pink’ was a bit dark but P3 ‘Murderous Magenta’ felt about right so I went with that in the end.

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      1. Gabbi

        Yes, I was thinking the same. I do love the plastic we’re used to nowadays, and think it’s a great material to work with, but those old models have lot of character, something that is somewhat gone missing now…
        Or maybe is just nostalgia…? 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Somet Post author

        On the whole I prefer modern plastics but there are some great old metal models out there worth collecting. There are also some howlers too that not even rose tinted nostalgia can’t forgive. I think it’s a real pick and choose game based on personal taste but luckily GW were so prolific there’s lots to choose from!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. E S Taylor

    Brings back fond memories, when GW used to be a hobbyist company. We would use citadel miniatures for many different games. I also remember when White Dwarf Magazine covered multiple games like D&D.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Somet Post author

      Yes, the golden age of White Dwarf. Before it became dictated entirely to GW games and miniatures within the Warhammer licences. I remember it well too!

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