Category Archives: 1985-1990

Reaper Bones Dwarf Cleric and Citadel C11 Halfling

A couple of miniatures destined primarily for use in my D&D game here.

First up is a Reaper Bones Dwarf Cleric – ‘Barden Barrelstrap’.

This miniature was going to be part of my (as of yet unassembled let alone painted) Dwarf KOW army. There’s still a chance he could get a secondment back into the army with a quick change of base.

Next is a Citadel Miniatures C11 Halfling ‘Dery Podgebelly’

This miniature appears to be from 1986ish, I can’t seem to find any drawings or photographs of it prior to that. Needless to say it’s a tiny figure and is based on a 20mm round.

Citadel Goblins

Various mixed Goblins here. included are some C12/C13 Great/Night Goblins from the early 80s, the original Grom model and trooper from the first version of the RR3 Regiment of Renown set, a couple of later C12 Goblins and finally Grizlock the Hobgoblin from the 2nd Dungeon Monsters Starter Set.

C13 Night Goblin

RR3 Grom and Trooper

C12 Great Goblin

C12 Goblins (from the later 80s)

Grizlock the Hobgoblin

Group shot

Marauder Miniatures Orcs (plus something else!)

I was quite partial to the Marauder Miniatures Orcs with their leather scale armour when they first appeared in 1989. Back in the early 90s I bought an MB2 Regiment plus a blister pack of the MM25 ‘extra’ figures in one of GWs clear out sales. All those were sadly lost in time but here’s a Marauder Orc Stone Thrower crew member from that era I’ve picked up recently.

Just what this next miniature is is a bit of a mystery. It came in an eBay job lot several years ago with other figures all from the late 70s/early 80s.

It appears to be a werebear of some description. I saw another one for sale on eBay a couple of years ago but the seller wasn’t sure of its origin either. It’s pretty grotty sculpting but I think it has old school charm! It might just become the Were replacement for the oversized Reaper Bones Werewolf In my Frostgrave collection.

PCs for 5th Ed D&D

Since returning to gaming and painting I’ve been fortunate enough to have played RPGs on pretty much a weekly basis. I’m currently DMing 5th Ed D&D ‘Storm King’s Thunder’ so I painted up some miniatures to represent the PCs where our larger combats use a battlemat.

Elf Rogue

This is a Ral Partha miniature available from RPE as part of their Dark Eye range. The PC was originally created as male but then the player changed the gender at the start of the first play session. There’s a fair few female Elf miniatures of course but a lot of them tend to be either Magic Users or Rangers; this seemed the best Ranger type to represent a female Rogue – Elves aways have bows no matter what.

Dwarf Fighter

There was some discussion about gender at character generation for this one too. The player originally settled on female so I got a Ral Partha Dwarf miniature to represent her.

By the next session they had changed her to a male Dwarf so I needed a new miniature! Rather than have the female Dwarf languish in my lead pile she got painted up along with the Citadel ‘Dwarf Lords of Legend’ Uther I decided to use.

Tiefling Warlock 

There aren’t a lot of Tiefling miniatures out there to represent this PC. I toyed with alternatives for this including various Demon miniatures and Games Workshop Ungors.

In the end I settled for this Reaper Bones Hellborn miniature. I would have preferred it in metal but I couldn’t find one in the UK.

Dwarf Cleric

No one wanted to play a Cleric as their main PC despite the serious makeover they’ve had in 5th Ed. Their obvious strength is still ‘Team Medic’ though so the players rolled up one to accompany them. He also serves as a PC for any occasional guest players we get. This is a Heartbreaker Miniatures Dwarf sculpted by Kevin Adams – proving he’s not just the one dimensional Goblin creation machine we sometimes think he is!

Half Elf Warlock 

You’ll need to stretch your imagination a bit with this one. The player is keen on casting ‘mage armour’ on his PC so wanted a miniature with suitably impressive looking armour – even if this magic only gives him the equivalent AC of leather armour!

This is a Heartbreaker Miniatures Elf Warrior figure sculpted by Chaz Elliott. It reminds me of the Citadel Stormbringer miniatures by Jes Goodwin.There’s a definite Elric vibe to him but then Charles did have a history with this sort of thing.

A (slightly blurry – sorry!) group shot. Of course I also felt the need to use hex bases as a homage to the 1980s Citadel AD&D range.

Citadel Dwarf Troll Slayers

Dwarf Troll Slayers. The Warhammer fluff went something like this – 

“Disgraced and outcast from Dwarf society for some misdemeanor over pride or honour they took an oath to become Troll Slayers. They threw aside the conservative conventions of Dwarf life and instead sought an honorable death at the hands of the largest monster they could find.”

Basically the punk rocker of the Dwarf world they adopted dyed spiky hair, chains, leather, apathy and probably safety pins if you looked closely enough. Very 100 Club circa 1976.

Dwarf berserkers were already a thing in WFB and make an appearance in ‘The Magnificent Sven’ scenario included in 1984’s 2nd edition ruleset. They were subject to ‘alcoholism’ and ‘frenzy’ rules and even had a hint of the morose about them in times of peace and sobriety, however the full transformation into what famously became the Troll Slayer happened a little later.

For older Grognards their first introduction probably came with WFRP in late 1986. The Troll Slayer was a PC career for Dwarfs and one individual famously featured on the front cover illustration by John Sibbick.

This wasn’t the first mention of the doomed and disgraced vertically challenged. That came in 1985 with the Dwarf Lords of Legend boxed set that included Kimril Giantslayer. This is possibly the first use of Giant Slayer in a Warhammer Dwarf context. I also think he’s the Slayer Sibbick used as the basis for his WFRP cover. Throbin Death Eye came in this set too and looks like a Troll Slayer however with no mention of Trolls at this stage I suspect he was still technically considered a Dwarf berserker.

By 3rd Edition WFB (late 1987) the berserker had been sidelined and the Troll Slayer was firmly planted in the game. The later Felix and Gotrek novels ensured it’s lasting popularity. Even today it’s still in AoS – albeit under a different name. 

Like most things over time with GW the Troll/Giant/etc etc Slayers became more and more ridiculous, a parody of themselves with impossibly coiffured Mohican haircuts and gigantic battle axes. And of course they all started to look the same; much as the Punks of the early 1980s who, protesting their individuality, were really just tired clichés; emulations of 1976 wearing what had become a universally recognised uniform of Punk.

Anyway here’s some Dwarfs I’ve painted.

The first photo is mostly older berserker miniatures including Juggo Jorikson of ‘The Magnificent Sven’ fame (and also included here is Kimril Giantslayer). The Dwarf on the left is the oldest GW Dwarf berserker miniature I know of and is pre slotta.

The next photo are early 1990s Troll Slayers from GW’s offshoot Marauder Miniatures. You will notice the size creep in these miniatures compared to the early berserker models. Later Troll Slayer figures were even bigger.

Obligatory unit shot.

Frostgrave Combatants Pt7 – Knight

This model came in the same job lot purchase from eBay as the AD&D Assassin shown previously. He is of course Harald (Harry) the Hammer.

There’s been three versions of him over the years that I’m aware of. An early 80s pre-slotta version based on the WFB 1st Ed box cover art, a 2008 25th Anniversary limited edition Chaos Warrior and this one from the ‘Heroic Fighters of the Known World’ box set circa 1987.

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I’ll count this as a Knight for now rather than a standard Soldier although I do have boxes of both Fireforge Deus Vult Templar and Teutonic Infantry to make up which probably fit the bill better.

ME41 Goblin Warg Rider

I’ve mentioned before my predilection for the official AD&D miniatures produced under licence by Citadel in 1985. Of course that wasn’t the only line of licenced miniatures they were producing at this time. Another particularly splendid range (assuming you ignore the gargantuan 30mm Boromir mounted on a tiny 25mm scale horse) was the official Lord Of The Rings miniatures range.

This small set of figures was only part of Citadel’s range for a couple of years before the Lord of the Rings licence from Tolkien Enterprises moved on to Mithril Miniatures – presumably because Games Workshop wanted to concentrate their efforts on the more profitable Warhammer game line. Like all the figures designed at this point in time by Citadel they clearly show the transition in technical improvements in comparison to a lot of the ‘lumpy’ and poorly sculpted pre-slotta models in production from only the year before.

This particular goblin miniature (like other mounted figures across Citadel’s ranges then) was blister packed with another figure to represent the same miniature on foot. I never bought this blister but did manage to own the mounted goblin and wolf through a trade with a friend in 1986. I had plans for it to join my large Goblinoid Army in the ranks of the wolf riders however when the time came to paint and assemble these in the late 80s this model had disappeared – presumably a casualty of poor storage as I certainly don’t remember trading it.

Recently wanting to own this figure again had me searching for several months to try and buy a bargain on eBay as a replacement. This met with no success so in the end I bit the bullet and bought this one for about £7.

Back in the late 80s when I originally painted my wolf riders wolves were painted without any thought to how wolf fur actually looked. They were all the victims of a monotone coat of bluey grey like ‘Elf Grey’ or black with lighter grey highlights. This wasn’t just me trying to speed dry brush my way through regiments – it was the accepted norm that even GW studio painters used. There had also been a universal agreement by this point that Goblins had green skins and red eyes.

So with no desire to paint this as a green skin goblin on a plain grey wolf here’s my version with a nod towards more variation found in wolf fur colouration and a different take on goblin skin tone.

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